Swine Flu on the Rise in the U.S. According to CDC

CDC

Center for Disease Control and Prevention

By now we’ve all heard of the swine flu pandemic sweeping across Mexico and the U.S. at an alarming rate. As of noon EST, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) reports that there are 109 cases of swine flu spread across 11 states in the U.S., and the pandemic alert has been raised to Phase 5 (out of 6).

The CDC just held a news conference to update the public about the most recent news relating to the swine flu problem in the United States. They pointed out that the swine flu virus (aka H1N1 strain) has effected 109 people in the U.S. including 1 death in Texas. The CDC expects more deaths before the swine flu pandemic is all said and done. Sounds scary, but it’s important to point out that swine flu isn’t necessarily a “deadly” virus in most cases, so there’s no need to panic.

What is Swine Flu?
The CDC reports that swine flu is much like other flu viruses except that it’s a different strain of flu virus. Many people have the misconception that contracting swine flu is a death sentence – that’s far from the truth. As with other flu strains which account for thousands of deaths in the U.S. each year, the swine flu is most dangerous in children, the elderly, and those with weak immune systems – and even then, it doesn’t equate to sure death.

Swine Flu Prevention

Like other flu strain prevention tips, preventing the spread of swine flu includes:

  • washing your hands frequently
  • coughing/sneezing into your arm and not into your hands
  • staying home from school/work if you’re feeling sick

Following these basic rules will minimize the risk of catching the swine flu virus.

A swine flu vaccination is also in the works, although you shouldn’t expect to see one for another month or so. Until then, it’s important not to panic! If you do feel ill, you should consult your doctor immediately as a precautionary measure. For more information you can call 1-800-CDC-INFO. There’s also a wealth of information about swine flu available at PandemicFlu.gov.

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